Welcome to Front Towards Gamer

Front Towards Gamer is a community devoted to bringing active duty, military veterans and civilian supporters together in which gaming is the focus.

This community has gaming news, streaming teams, and gaming talk for like-minded gamers.  If you are interested in joining the community, simply sign-up below.

  • Announcements

    • Austin (Manned Gamer)

      Youtube Team   10/02/2017

      If you want to be a team that makes videos and post them on a YouTube channel were a team works and learns together. Fill out this short questionnaire about the FTG YouTube Team! https://goo.gl/forms/aaUcAFz7uC8qJzXv1 - By Austin - the Media Manger at FrontTowardsGamer -

Search the Community: Showing results for tags 'paradox interactive'.



More search options

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Categories

  • Stream Images
  • OSD Images
  • FTG Images
  • 8-Bit Salute Images

Categories

  • General News
  • Gaming Events
  • Tabletop Games
  • Game Reviews
  • Game Opinion
  • 20Q
  • Interviews

Calendars

  • OSD Twitch Streaming
  • Community Streams
  • Twitch FrontPage Streams
  • 8 Bit Salute Streams

Group


Active Duty or Veteran


Where Supporting?


Twitter


Facebook Profile Link


YouTube Link


Twitch Link


Steam ID


XBOX GT


PSN ID


BattleNet ID

Found 5 results

  1. BattleTech Review (PC)

    BattleTech is the latest edition to a long line of games following the creation of BattleTech as a tabletop war game. Fans of this game have been through almost thirty years of changes and permutations, including (number of table top iterations and number of different games). Harebrained schemes have partnered with Paradox Interactive to create their latest, shiniest addition to this established franchise. When meeting them at PDXCON and getting the announcement of the upcoming release, it certainly felt the most out-of-leftfield game announced. Amidst a sea of strategy games comes a tabletop-inspired battle simulator using gigantic mechs and lasers - not at all what was expected. At present, BattleTech is only playable as a simple 1v1 skirmish, mainly just to demonstrate the core combat mechanics. In each battle you control a Lance of mechs, four individual gigantic armored weapons platforms balanced around different specialities, battling over lances to beat them for whatever reason. Each individual mech has their own specialty and specific purpose; the Commando mech exists primarily as a scout to rush forward and identify targets to allow the heavier mechs to lock their weapons and start the fight properly. This diversification creates an added layer of strategy, as you need to utilise your mechs for their intended purpose. However, I frequently found that my scouting mech was always the first to be utterly destroyed, as soon as it located the enemy it was fired on and burnt alive. The actual combat, which is the nuts and bolts of Battle Tech, is based around balacing three seperate parts of your mech: your weapons, your heat bar and your stability. Not only do you need to actively shoot your weapons at the enemy and try to destroy them, you also need to manage the heat generated from those weapons for each mech. Firing your high pwopered weapons too frequently is goign to result in yor mechs overheating and shutting down. Alongside this, each mech has a stability bar which becomes depleted the more you are hit. Once stability has hit the maximum, your mech... falls over. It makes a lot of sense to include a mechanic based around simply falling over, considering these are gigantic armored machines bigger than trees. Once knocked down, enemies will be able to make targeted shots on you, specifically aimed at particular parts of your mech. All this combines into a fairly detailed tactical battle simulator. Utilizing terrain and balancing the use of your weapons to triumph over the enemy. However, the issue is the speed and pace of the gameplay. When moving mechs into position, you spend a short while considering the tactical benefits of where to put them, trees to provide cover, mountains for better range etc. Then, you watch as they move agonizingly slowly forwards into position, then slowly turn themselves to face the enemy. Then on your enemy's turn, the enemy mechs move slowly around and into position and firing against you. Alongside the slow pace of the gameplay, the actual fighting part of the combat feels lackluster. It's satisfying and visceral to watch the explosions and lasers of your mechs fire against the enemy, but each round of firing feels too robotic, too wholly unnatural. It's intensely obvious that the gameplay is linked directly to a tabletop game because the act of choosing a target, picking the correct weapons and watching the shots fire slowly through the air is all. So. Slow. There's just not enough happening. Once you've got into position and started firing, it's essentially just clicking the same targets and firing on them with the same weapons again and again until you win. The only strategic depth once the mechs have clashed together is the use of flanks and targetted shots to inflict damage on a particular area. There's not really any kind of intricacy os nuance beyond just shooting constantly until either you or the enemy is defeated. Due to the intensely slow speed and relatively uninteresting gameplay beyond the initial setting up phase, BattleTech feels at the moment like a work in progress; it's supposed to have an incredibly in-depth and interesting singleplayer campaign that will hopefully bring a much-needed sense of investment and reasoning to the combat. With the full release of the singeplayer, I look forward to experiencing more nuanced gameplay. Until then, I struggle to see Battle Tech having more than a couple hours of playtime.
  2. Crusader Kings 2: The Reaper’s Due is the expansion for the incredibly engrossing incest-and-murder simulator that is Crusader Kings 2. The general aim behind this expansion was to… expand… thoroughly on the mechanic of illness within the game. Previously, characters can become ill somewhat randomly; they would gain the trait “Ill” and it might become worse, or get better – nothing you do really affects what happens. Now, with the (perhaps slightly expensive price of $10) purchase of The Reaper’s Due, characters can contract a wide variety of illnesses, including developing specific symptoms with their own associated effects. Alongside this, you gain the ability to appoint a Court Physician, whose job it is to ensure the people within your realm don’t die horribly of food poisoning. However, when hunting for new Court Physicians, if you refuse one who is interested in the job, they just… die. They “disappear without trace”. It makes me feel like an arbitrary mad king; so… powerful: “Won’t someone rid me of this troublesome Doctor?” This, of course, comes with an expansion of plague – this is the Middle Ages, there are epidemics aplenty; to bring the game even closer to historical accuracy, you can now catch a variety of serious ailments, including Black Death, Slow Fever, Dysentery and so many more. The total amount of enjoyment and fun added by this expansion? It’s tricky to say; adding more content into a grand historical strategy game like this usually creates either more difficulty or more layers of depth within the game. The latter can generally be seen as superior to the former – mindless difficulty is almost always boring, whereas increased depth can usually be enjoyable. The Reaper’s Due causes you to need to deal with making sure your characters don’t die horribly from a random affliction of cancer. There are a variety of events added to create further flavor, including the ability to dictate how your physician treats you. So, it certainly adds an additional layer of depth not originally present. It is, however, rather frustrating that characters get a variety of illnesses and die more often. Sure, it’s historical and correct, but the increase in managing your family’s ailments can get a little tedious. Having more characters dying from ailments can feel pretty random at some points. Sure, it makes sense – people get sick and die! But, having your best kid (genius, with awesome military traits) die from a cough and then suddenly your wife has cancer and your physician is useless. I’ve certainly laughed quite a lot at random deaths, but I’ve also become very irritated at losing people when it was inconvenient. Such is Crusader Kings 2, however…
  3. Crusader Kings 2: Conclave Review

    Conclave is the much-awaited expansion for Crusader Kings 2, adding a variety of council mechanics and the dreaded coalition feature from Europa Universalis IV that attempts to curb the growth map-painting players. The big thing about Conclave, the ever-feared coalition changes, was… controversial, to say the least. This is understandable, as very suddenly nations large and small would unite to curb stomp the player for daring to expand. The strangest thing I discovered when testing out coalitions was finding Muslim powers uniting with Christian powers, which seems… Odd, to say the least. Considering the historical period in which CK2 takes place, to have these kinds of anachronistic partnerships irked a many players. They are currently working on altering the mechanics to forbid the possibility of cross-religion coalitions in a future patch, but one does hope that this kind of inevitable problem could be seen in advance by the testing team? Therein lays the usual complaint with Paradox Interactive titles and expansions; why on earth wasn’t this tested? Obviously, not everything can be tested in comparison to the tens of thousands of man hours that are played on release day, but sometimes mechanics that will so obviously be broken on release… Why aren’t they just changed? Complaints about coalitions and their absurd immensity notwithstanding, Conclave is an immense expansion to CK2. Previously, vassals served as a minor annoyance for your conquering; maybe they’d rebel, maybe they want some choice Dukedom that you have – it never really mattered, you could likely crush them with ease. With the Council mechanics, however, vassals actually matter. Now, your most powerful vassals will expect a seat on your council, giving them the right to vote on basically any action you want to take. I found the fact that my vassals could dictate when I could declare war incredibly irritating, but once I grew used to it I recognized how much it changed my style of play. Now, I needed to properly manage my vassal relations; I need to curry favour, ensure my friends and family members are powerful enough to back me up and, above all, stockpile cash to buy favours. However, the depth of these mechanics feels somewhat lacking. It is certainly very cool and interesting to have to care about your vassal’s opinions and votes but the extent to which you can control them is essentially just “buy favours”. It also feels as though the reason for the vassal AI’s choices is rather arbitrary; there are simply quite a lot of times where I find myself wondering why on earth this vassal thinks this, or why I can’t get a favour from them. Why doesn’t it explicitly say? It would appear that the main problem Conclave suffers from is a significant lack of depth and clarity. Lots of things happen in the game that didn’t before, but there are a lot of times when I simply don’t know why they happen, or how to stop them. I appreciate the mechanical changes and think that they will absolutely create a whole new level of play for CK2, but more clarity and depth in future patches will be needed before I would consider it something wholly positive. I do have faith in Paradox Interactive as a company though; they can usually be counted on to amend any issues their expansions create and end up with a player-friendly result. Also, you can make the entire world ruled by Horses if you have the inclination, so it certainly has that going for it.
  4. Europa Universalis IV (EU4) is a game that I endlessly come back to – I broke the 4 digit club (1000+ hours) over a year ago, but I still keep coming back to it. Paradox’s continuous release of expansions, patches and DLCs means that there is always something fresh for me to return to. This is both a good and bad thing. On the one hand, I get to experience a game I love and enjoy somewhat new each time, enjoying new features and changed mechanics. On the other, it feeds an addiction that sees me going to bed at 1 in the morning, despite previous obligations. Paradox Interactive, one might say, is the most friendly Swedish drug dealer I know. Europa Universalis IV’s most recent expansion, ‘Rights of Man’, focuses on increasing the control you have over both your subjects and your leaders. Paradox love to alter the game mechanics of their games quite drastically with new expansions and ‘Rights of Man’ is no different. To start, numerous nations have updated government forms, as well as increasingly interesting Dynamic Historical Events, particularly focusing on Prussia and Ethiopia. There’s a lot of really interesting changes to Prussia’s government, for example, that makes them more of an Army with a State, rather than a State with an Army. If that makes sense. The meat and bones of this expansion however is the addition of Traits. Now, both leaders and rulers can gain traits that affect their stats that they bring to the table, as well as how they govern. Maybe your ruler is greedy and gets more tax revenue; he could also be Loose Lipped, so you can expect that he’ll spill the beans to other nations about his plans to attack that tasty neighbouring minor nation. These traits are gained over time and really help to build a sense of identity and character for each of your leaders. The most significant change I experience in the game is the change to technology. Previously, all nations existed within technology groups – these groups dictated the cost of going up a technology level, thus providing access to better buildings, different army types and a myriad of other benefits. You existed within those technology groups based on where your nation started – it makes sense as after all, a Native American nation is clearly not going to progress at the same rate technologically as a European nation, right? Now however, all nations start on the same footing – they progress and purchase new technologies at the same base cost. However, we now have a lovely new feature called Institutions. These essentially represent an idealism, a way of thinking or great change in the manner in which life is lived. Most nations start with Feudalism already in existence (not all nations, though! Tribal nations understandably do not!). The Renaissance is next, followed by the outbreak of colonialism. These Institutions spread across the world through provinces, getting more and more accepted each month – a nation can pay to have it accepted nation wide, with a diminishing gold cost associated with the amount of provinces that have been ‘converted’ to that Institution. Alongside cheaper tech, you also get access to a few mild benefits – for example, having Feudalism means you can enjoy an extra Military leader on your staff. This is all really interesting, but it comes with a few problems. Firstly, Institutions appear in a random province when they do appear. Basically giving that nation those benefits for free straight away. Nations that don’t have that Institution receive a yearly 1% tech penalty, up to 50%! Problem is, even if you’re playing Prussia in Northern Germany, you might have to wait about 50 years to get the Institution to take effect in your nation, essentially giving you a massive malus to your technology in comparison to some other nation that was lucky enough to get it first. It just takes waaaaay too long for it to spread. Another problem it brings is the dependence on gold – because you can pay gold (dependant on the amount of your provinces so far converted) to convert your whole nation, gold becomes even more insanely important to a game of EU4. Countries with the most cash can now essentially buy cheaper tech in comparison to others. So, money improvement is now fantastically the most important aspect to EU4. I’ve actually declared a pretty major war in Europe, simply so that I can nick some of that other nation’s cash to pay for the institution, so as to get a tech lead on those around me. While it adds a really nice layer of strategic depth, the irritation of needing to manage technology maluses to a far worse extent than previously, coupled with an excessive focus on gold generation, means that ‘Rights of Man’ is less about Thomas Paine’s treatise on the innate rights of his fellow man, and more about living in a rich man’s world. You can see Aldrahill’s YouTube channel right here, where he’s currently playing Ethiopia in EU4, doing some achievement hunting.
  5. Crusader Kings 2: The Reaper’s Due is the latests expansion for the incredibly engrossing incest-and-murder simulator that is Crusader Kings 2. The general aim behind this expansion was to… expand… thoroughly on the mechanic of illness within the game. Previously, characters can become ill somewhat randomly; they would gain the trait “Ill” and it might become worse, or get better – nothing you do really affects it. Now, with the (perhaps slightly expensive price of $10) purchase of The Reaper’s Due, characters can contract a wide variety of illnesses, including developing specific symptoms with their own associated effects. Alongside this, you gain the ability to appoint a Court Physician, whose job it is to ensure the people within your realm don’t die horribly of food poisoning. However, when hunting for new Court Physicians, if you refuse one who is interested in the job, they just… die. They “disappear without trace”. It makes me feel like an arbitrary mad king; so… powerful: “Won’t someone rid me of this troublesome Doctor?” This of course comes with an expansion of plague – this is the Middle Ages, there are epidemics aplenty; to bring the game even closer to historical accuracy, you can now catch a variety of serious ailments, including: Black Death, Slow Fever, Dysentery and many more. The total amount of enjoyment and fun added by this expansion? It’s tricky to say; adding more content into a grand historical strategy game like this usually creates either more difficulty, or more layers of depth within the game. The latter can generally be seen as superior to the former – mindless difficulty is almost always boring, whereas increased depth can usually be enjoyable. The Reaper’s Due causes you to need to deal with making sure your characters don’t die horribly from a random affliction of cancer. There are a variety of events added to create further flavor, including the ability to dictate how your physician treats you. So, it certainly adds an additional layer of depth not originally present. It is, however, rather frustrating that characters get a variety of illnesses and die more often. Sure, it’s historical and correct, but the increase in managing your family’s ailments can get a little tedious. Having more characters dying from ailments can feel pretty random at some points. Sure, it makes sense – people get sick and die! But, having your best kid (genius, with awesome military traits) die from a cough and then suddenly your wife has cancer and your physician is useless. I’ve certainly laughed quite a lot at random deaths, but I’ve also become very irritated at losing people when it was inconvenient. Such is Crusader Kings 2, however…
Mountain View

OPERATION SUPPLY DROP

501(c)(3) tax-exempt organization.

BUILT BY VETERANS

Mountain View